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Sun. Jan. 5, 2020

Engelbert Humperdinck

Hänsel und Gretel

Conductor: Tomas Hanus, Director: Adrian Noble
With Boaz Daniel, Stephanie Houtzeel, Margaret Plummer, Andrea Carroll, Monika Bohinec

 

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  • Engelbert Humperdinck  |  Musik
  • Tomáš Hanus  |  Conductor
  • Adrian Noble  |  Director
  • Anthony Ward  |  Stage and costume design
  • Jean Kalman  |  Light Design
  • Denni Sayers  |  Choreography
  • Andrzej Goulding  |  Video

Boaz Daniel | Peter Besenbinder

DANIEL BOAZ was born in Tel Aviv, studied in the University there, and then continued his vocal studies from 1996 to 1999 in the Conservatoire of Vienna. In 1999, he received the promotional prize in the Eberhard Waechter-Medaille in Vienna. In 1998, he became an ensemble member of the Wiener Staatsoper, where his repertoire includes, among others, works ranging from Conte d’Almaviva (Le nozze di Figaro), Sharpless (Madama Butterfly), Belcore (L’elisir d’amore), Paolo (Simon Boccanegra), Marcello (La Bohème), Enrico (Lucia di Lammermoor), Kurwenal (Tristan und Isol­de), Lescaut (Manon Lescaut), Ford (Falstaff), Klingsor (Parsifal), Rangoni (Boris Godunow), Valentin (Faust), Rodrigo (Don Carlo), Jeletzki (Pique Dame), Sonora (La fanciulla del West), Heerrufer (Lohengrin) to Gunther (Götterdämmerung). He received repeated invitations to the ROH Covent Garden, the Deutsche Oper Berlin, the New Israeli Opera, the Dresdner Semperoper, to Chicago, Turin, Salzburg, San Francisco, Frankfurt and Barcelona. Recently, he has celebrated success in the Lyric Opera of Chicago in Ernani, as well as in Don Giovanni in Graz, in Tel Aviv in Un ballo in maschera, and in Tristan und Isolde in Hamburg, Berlin and London.


 

Stephanie Houtzeel | Gertrud

The Mezzosoprano Stephanie Houtzeel recieved her „Master of Music“ from the Juilliard School in New York and is a prizewinner of several competitions. She has been in leading roles in the Opéra National de Paris, the Zurich Opera, the Semperoper, the Washington Kennedy Centre, the New York City Opera, the Theater an der Wien, the Opéra de Lyon, the Opéra National du Rhin, the Royal Danish Opera, the Teatro Nacional de São Carlos, the New Israeli Opera, the Graz Opera and at the Salzburg Festival. Since the 2010/2011 season, she is an ensemble member of the Wiener Staatsoper, where she has been seen singing the roles of Komponist, Octavian, Dorabella, Siébel, Varvara, Nicklausse, Kreusa, Orlofsky and Jenny Hill. Aside from the big Strauss and Mozart roles of her vocal range, her repertoire includes among others, Charlotte, Gluck’s Orfeo, Händel’s Ariodante, Ottavia, Valencienne or Amando in Grand Macabre. Future performances are leading the Mezzosoprano among others to Graz (Leading Role in Xerxes), to the Komische Oper Berlin and to the Bayreuther Festivals. In 2015, her new CD Nostalgia will be released. ​

Margaret Plummer | Hänsel

The Australian Mezzosoprano MARGARET PLUMMER completed her singing studies at the Sydney Conservatoire of Music. Furthermore, she is trained as a Jazz singer. She is a multiple prize-winner at opera competitions and visited the School of Music and Theater in Hannover in 2005. For a while, she was a member of the choir of the Opera Australia, before wtarting her career as a soloist. In this way, performances followed among others, at the Opera Australia and the Pinchgut Opera. In the 2015/2016 season, she will be the youngest scholar of the Opera Foundation Australia. Margaret Plummer has sang among others, Dorabella in Così fan tutte at the Pacific Opera and Hänsel in Hänsel und Gretel at the Ozopera School‘s Company. At the Opera Australia, Margaret Plummer sang in Dido und Aeneas, in the Rosenkavalier and in Le Nozze di Figaro. She sang Knusperhexe in Hänsel und Gretel with the Sydney Symphony, Charlotte in Werther at the Lyric Opera of Melbourne, Phoebe in Rameaus Castor and Pollux at the Pinchgut Opera. At the Wiener Staatsoper she gave her debut as Tebaldo in Don Carlo.
 

Andrea Carroll | Gretel

ANDREA CARROLL studied at the Manhattan School of Music. She has received numerous awards (for example the Houston Grand Opera´s Ealeanor McCollum Competition, Metropolitan Opera National Council Audition) and has received grants for example from the Shoshana Foundation or the William Matheaus Sullivan Foundation. Most recently she was a member of the Houston Grand Opera Studio for two years. There, she sang parts such as Musetta in La Bohème, Adele in Die Fledermaus, Anne Egerman in A Little Night Music, Woglinde in Das Rheingold. At the Utah Opera she sang Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro and Leila in Les pêcheurs de perles. At the Wolf Trap Opera she performed Corinna in Il viaggio a Reims and Zerlina in Don Giovanni. At the Glimmerglass Opera she was Julie Jordan in Carousel and Rose Segal in Later the Same Evening. Furthermore she sang Rosalba in Florencia en el Amazonas at the Washington National Opera; at the Seattle Opera she performed as Echo in Ariadne auf Naxos. As of September 2015 she is member of the ensemble of the Wiener Staatsoper. 

Monika Bohinec | Knusperhexe

The mezzo-soprano Monika Bohinec studied at the Mozarteum in Salzburg and at the University for Music and Performing Arts in Vienna. As a student, she was a finalist and award winner of different competitions and a scholarship holder of the Richard Wagner Foundation and the Hilde Zadek Foundation.

In 2006, she made her debut as Clarissa in Die Liebe zu den drei Orangen at the Slovenian State Opera, where she appeared as Jezibaba in Rusalka, Konchakowna (Fürst Igor), Suzuki in Madama Butterfly and in the title role of Carmen.
In 2009 Monika Bohinec became ensemble member of the Mannheim National Theatre, where she sang Carmen, Sara di Nottingham (Roberto Devereux), Laura and Cieca (La Gioconda), Maddalena (Rigoletto), Giulietta (Les Contes d’Hoffmann) and Ulrica (Un ballo in maschera).

In the season 2011/2012 Monika Bohinec became ensemble member of the Vienna State Opera where she sang e.g. Larina, Grimgerde, Marthe, Farzana, Schenkenwirtin, Lola, Mary, Marcellina, Fenena, Ulrica, Suzuki, Margret, Madelon and Erste Norn.

Ouverture London, Christmas circa 1890. A Victorian family gathers happily in the living room around the Christmas tree. The father surprises everyone with a mysterious, new device: a laterna magica, which projects all kinds of unfamiliar and wonderful pictures on the wall and also opens the door to a strange, fairy tale world ...  Act 1 Instead of carrying out the chores assigned to them, tormented by hunger the siblings Hansel and Gretel pass the time in the wretched hut that is their home by singing and dancing. They eagerly await the evening and with it the return of their parents, because today there will finally be something to eat before they go to bed: the children hope that their Mother will make a rice pudding using the milk given to them by a neighbour. But when the Mother finally comes home, the mood changes abruptly. Furious that Hansel and Gretel have spent their time playing together rather than making brooms and knitting stockings, she rushes over to the children to give them a beating. In doing so, she accidentally knocks the jug with the milk in it off the table. Hansel’s snickering at her clumsiness, the jug fragments on the floor and the spilled milk cause the Mother to lose her temper, and she sends the children out into the nearby forest to pick strawberries. Left alone, she laments the poverty and hunger her family suffers and drops wearily off to sleep. Awakened by her cheery, somewhat drunken husband, who for once has been able to sell all his brooms and has bought a big supply of various groceries with the proceeds. But their joy is short-lived. Dismayed that his children have been sent out alone, the Father tells his wife about the man-eating Witch who lives in Ilsenstein, a particularly dark and notorious part of the forest. Filled with concern, the parents rush out of the hut to find Hansel and Gretel before nightfall and bring them home.  Act 2 While Hansel picks strawberries, filling his basket to the brim, Gretel makes a wreath. Happy that this time they have done as their Mother asked, they become absorbed in all kinds of games and forget to go home on time. To make matters even worse, before they realize what they are doing, the two of them gradually eat all the strawberries they had collected. Horrified, they set out to look for more, but notice full of trepidation that they have got lost in the evening darkness of the forest. The good Sandman then appears and sprinkles sand in their eyes. Huddled together, Hansel and Gretel go to sleep after saying their evening prayers. In a beautiful dream, fourteen angels hover around them, and they have a reassuring sense of death and new life.  Act 3 The next morning, Hansel and Gretel are awakened by the Dew Fairy and discover the Witch’s gingerbread house. When Hansel breaks off a piece, the Witch’s voice is heard from within the house. However, since nothing more threatening happens, the children start to nibble at the house, until the Witch emerges. At first she seems to be friendly, but she soon reveals her true colours: she casts a spell on Hansel and Gretel and locks Hansel in a cage, where she plans to fatten him up. In exuberant anticipation of eating the children, the Witch clambers onto her broomstick and for some time flies ecstatically through the air. After her ride, she tries to persuade Gretel to look into the oven. Her plan to push the unsuspecting girl into the oven and bake her into gingerbread does not succeed; warned by her brother, Gretel pretends to be stupid and asks the Witch to show her how to look into the oven. Impatiently, the Witch agrees to Gretel’s request and leans far into the oven. At that moment, Hansel and Gretel push her in, and she perishes miserably. Hardly has the Witch died than the many gingerbread men standing around the house turn into boys and girls. They all fell into the Witch’s trap and were turned into gingerbread in the oven: but now the spell is broken. Hansel and Gretel stroke the children and with the help of the magic wand break the last spell. The grateful children dance joyously around their rescuers. A little later, Hansel and Gretel’s parents find the happy group, having been searching for their children through the night. Grateful and filled with joy they sing together: “When our need is at its greatest, the Lord our God holds out his hand.”